Category Archives: Feature

Exclusive Report: Revealing How Police Use Social Media To Subvert Your Choices

We reveal how Police use Twitter and Facebook to change human behaviour. The following list is a proof that our Police can make an impact in our lives.

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New South Wales Police Officer With PTSD Stalked By Insurance Company Metlife

Amy Shaw is a former New South Wales Police officer battling Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. While there are over a thousand of officers in Australia with PTSD, hers and the case of 300 other officers is unique. Continue reading New South Wales Police Officer With PTSD Stalked By Insurance Company Metlife

Special Victims Unit: Female NYPD Officers Reveal Their Most Heartbreaking Stories

Life in the NYPD is something that’s highly regarded in pop culture and also something that’s heavily scrutinized in the media. What it isn’t, though, is an easy feat in terms of mental and physical stability — or longevity. This is especially true for the women detectives.

Note: Some stories in this article may be disturbing to readers, as they involve child abuse, sexual abuse, and graphic violence. Last names have been omitted according to the wishes of the sources and the confidential nature of the information published.

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Victoria Police Special Operations Group (SOG) now ‘The Peacemakers’

They are known as the Special Operations Group but within police circles this secretive unit is referred to simply as “The Soggies” or “The Group”.

The Special Operations Group (SOG) is the police tactical group of the Victoria Police. The SOG unit is part of the Operations Support division of the Transit & Public Safety command, which falls under the Field Operations executive command.

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You Are Not Alone: Royal Canadian Mounted Police Talk About Their Experiences

Je mourais à l’intérieur – I was dying inside

RCMP Constable Annabelle Dionne. Photo: Lori Wilson, Families of the RCMP for PTSD Awareness
RCMP Constable Annabelle Dionne. Photo: Lori Wilson, Families of the RCMP for PTSD Awareness
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) has distributed a video in which nine members of the RCMP reveal their distress and their experiences of post-traumatic stress disorder, a mental illness that contributed to the suicides of thirty Canadian first responders this year, according to the association Tema Conter Memorial Trust.

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Meet Those Accused of Family Violence – and the Lawyers Who Defend Them

Dandenong Magistrates' Court
Dandenong Magistrates’ Court
Dandenong is one of the state’s busiest courts for intervention orders. That’s clear from the crowded foyer for Courtroom Seven where such matters are heard. The bench seats are thronged with people aged from 18 to 80 and the queue in front of the registrar never seems to get shorter.

Since last December, the Dandenong court has run a pilot to see how prioritising family violence intervention orders improves outcomes.

Under the pilot, the first appearance for those who have breached an intervention order is one week.  For those on summons, mentions and contested hearings, it’s four weeks. Before the pilot, it often took three months for a case to be listed,  due to the explosion in intervention orders, up 200 per cent from 16,889 in 2000-01 to 33,135 in 2013-14.

Offenders have high rates of recidivism, and dealing with matters promptly should protect victims by preventing an increase in the frequency and severity of further abuse.

But timely intervention is also good for perpetrators. Research published by the Centre for Innovative Justice in March on the pilot program suggests there is an ideal window of opportunity within the first days and weeks following police attendance or a court appearance, where the consequences of the perpetrator’s behaviour, the reality of the situation, has started to sink in and there is an openness to change.

“The early indications are good and clients are not coming back,” Scott says of the pilot.

Access to legal advice at this point is also essential. That sounds obvious – knowing whether to cop or contest charges or IVO applications requires evaluation of the evidence and advice on options.

But the reality is much more subtle than that. In effect, magistrates’ courts with family violence expertise offer a sophisticated triage system. At Dandenong, all clients with family violence-related matters are seen by either a VLA or Community Legal Centre lawyer, who refer alleged perpetrators to a suite of services to help them address problems underlying their offending, which commonly include drugs or alcohol, debt, anger management, mental illness and homelessness.

Read the (rather long) article in The Age.

Death In The Police Family

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An officer is in the intensive care unit of a hospital with a gunshot wound to the head and is showing no brain activity. His wife, in tears, is listening to the doctor explain brain death, policies, and decisions that must be made. Though some new friends are with her, she yearns for a family member to be at her side, but her family is on the other side of the country.

We’re republishing Ronald T. Constant’s essay on death, grieving process and support for the loved ones left behind. Even though it was written two decades ago, it provides very relevant and timely analysis, suggestions and insight.

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Not So Obvious Police Stress

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The following  essay was written by Ronald Terry Constant. “Not So Obvious Police Stress” rethinks the stress that most impacts a police officer. Contrary to what television would lead you to believe, police officers are debilitated by factors other than danger such as bank robberies. These insights are important to citizens as much as to officers, after all, citizens put guns on the people who are being affected by these stressors.

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Creative Police Photography Contest Results

You have spoken and the results are in!

Earlier in July we have asked you to vote for the best and most creative photos involving WA Police. Western Australia’s Police stations were also asked to tag their photos with #creativecopspics to show off their creativity and skills, and compete with other WA Police stations in a fun and friendly contest.

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