Tag Archives: RCMP

Halifax Police Chief’s PTSD Among Stories In Book About Public Protectors

Chief of Halifax Regional Police Jean-Michel (J.M.) Blais
Chief of Halifax Regional Police Jean-Michel (J.M.) Blais
The chief of Halifax Regional Police opens up about his battle with post-traumatic stress disorder in journalist Janice Landry’s new book, The Price We Pay.

Chief J.M. Blais was diagnosed in 2012 but told Landry of his plight during a June 2014 interview that took place shortly after three RCMP officers were killed in Moncton.

“I’m deeply humbled that the chief would feel comfortable enough with me to open up and make this statement,” Landry said in an interview.

Landry’s father was a career firefighter who, decades ago, saved an eight-week-old infant in a horrible house fire in Halifax. Landry’s book includes an interview with a man who came forward to say he accidentally started that fire as a young boy.

“The whole reason I started working in this area was to honour my late father and his peers. I’m trying to spark discussion.”

The emotional fallout of the Moncton killings may have played a role in Blais opening up to her, Landry said.

Blais, who was a Mountie for 25 years before he switched to Halifax Regional Police, spoke to her of more than a dozen officer funerals he’s attended and three challenging trips to Haiti.

Landry hopes her book shines a light on people who face incredible challenges in their professions and elsewhere.

Read more in The Chronicle Herald.

You Are Not Alone: Royal Canadian Mounted Police Talk About Their Experiences

Je mourais à l’intérieur – I was dying inside

RCMP Constable Annabelle Dionne. Photo: Lori Wilson, Families of the RCMP for PTSD Awareness
RCMP Constable Annabelle Dionne. Photo: Lori Wilson, Families of the RCMP for PTSD Awareness
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) has distributed a video in which nine members of the RCMP reveal their distress and their experiences of post-traumatic stress disorder, a mental illness that contributed to the suicides of thirty Canadian first responders this year, according to the association Tema Conter Memorial Trust.

Continue reading You Are Not Alone: Royal Canadian Mounted Police Talk About Their Experiences

RCMP Stands Sentry At National War Memorial To Honour Victoria Cross Winner

A sense of duty and history drove Staff Sgt. Dan Mayer of the RCMP to stand guard at the National War Memorial on Sunday.

History because the sentry duties marked 115 years since an RCMP officer was awarded the Victoria Cross, the country’s highest military honour, for rescuing a wounded soldier while under fire.

Duty because Mayer and others who took sentry duty had personal connections to the events of Oct. 22, when Cpl. Nathan Cirillo was killed while standing watch over the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Some were among the first responders to the memorial after the shootings on Oct. 22, and others remain charged with protecting the country from terrorist threats.


Read more in Westerly News.

Source: www.westerlynews.ca

Canadian Sunset Ceremonies In Ottawa

The Sunset Ceremonies is a time-honoured tradition in Ottawa, featuring the world-famous RCMP Musical Ride and the signature Sunset Ceremony. This year’s themes are the 50th anniversary of Canada’s national flag and honouring the Nation’s Heroes.


The performance line-up has something for all ages including:

  • Equestrian Abilities Show and Dressage Demonstration
  • Mounted Arms Display
  • RCMP/Ottawa Police Service Pipes and Drums and Dancers
  • Central Band of the Canadian Forces
  • Rescue dogs from the Ottawa Valley Search & Rescue Dog Association
  • Kids’ Zone that will include the DND kids’ obstacle course, petting zoo, face painting and much more.
Find out more on the RCMP website.


Source: www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca

RCMP Celebrates 40th Anniversary Swearing In of the First Female Troop

Thirty-two women made history 40 years ago today when they were sworn in as the first female police officers with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP).

Within a week, they formed Troop 17 and started six months of training in Regina, Sask., at the RCMP Academy, “Depot” Division, changing the face of the RCMP forever. On March 3, 1975, 30 graduated and were sent to detachments across the country to blaze the trail for the thousands who’ve since followed.

In recognition of the significant contribution of these women, and of all the women who’ve served as civilians dating back to the 1890s, the RCMP’s National Women’s Advisory Committee (NWAC) is launching a special section on rcmp.gc.ca to tell some of their stories.

Read more on Royal Canadian Mounted Police website.

Source: www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca

RCMP Service Dog Visits 5-year-old Manitoba Boy Who Named Him

Five-year-old Jackson Antoniw met face to face with the RCMP service dog he helped name when Hector made a rare school visit.

Jackson came up with the name Hector for one of the pups of the potential police service dogs born at the Police Dog Service Training Centre in Innisfail, Alta.

Hector was a hit and was announced a winner in the RCMP’s national Name the Puppy Contest.

Read more in Global News.

Source: globalnews.ca

Family Violence: RCMP Say Indigenous Women Are Still Overrepresented in Murder Statistics

Last year, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police revealed there were nearly 1,200 cases of murdered and missing Aboriginal women over three decades. Police said Friday they have made progress in solving cases, but the numbers continue to grow.

Officials with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) said that 11 more indigenous women have disappeared since its report in May of last year painted a disturbing picture for Canadians of an issue the RCMP calls “a national tragedy.”

And the murder rate for Aboriginal women continues to be disproportionately high, with 17 homicides in 2013 and 15 homicides in 2014.

“The update confirms that aboriginal women are most often killed by men in their own homes, in their own communities, and reconfirms the need to target prevention efforts towards family violence,” RCMP superintendent Tyler Bates told a news conference.


Read more on VICE.

Source: news.vice.com

Killing of St. Albert Mountie Prompts Sweeping Review of Bail Process In Alberta

The Alberta government has launched a sweeping review of its bail hearings practices after a repeat offender with violent criminal history shot and killed a St. Albert Mountie in January.

The report into the involvement of the Alberta Crown Prosecution Service with gunman Shawn Rehn recommends a further comprehensive review consider who may conduct bail hearings and in what circumstances, what information should be provided in bail packages prepared by police, and how best to ensure accuracy and availability of information, among other issues.

“We need to know if an improved bail process can respect people’s rights, but at the same time, better protect our communities and police,” Justice Minister Kathleeen Ganley said Tuesday after the 49-page report was released.

Read more in Vancouver Sun.

Source: www.vancouversun.com

Vancouver Island Homeless Man Finds $2,000 On Victoria Street, Brings It To RCMP

The honesty of a homeless man who turned in more than $2,000 he found on a suburban Victoria street could pay off for the unidentified Good Samaritan.

West Shore RCMP Const. Alex Berube said Tuesday that police are looking for the man to tell him his good deed has spurred people to donate to a fundraising effort that’s already hit $1,400.

Berube said police patrols are keeping watch for the man, who has no fixed address but is known in the community of Langford, just west of Victoria.

So far, a GoFundMe page has been launched to reward the man for his act of honesty. The fundraiser has so far raised over $1,600 in an effort to give back “good karma.”


Read more in CTV News and VanCity Buzz.

Source: www.ctvnews.ca