Tag Archives: privacy

Police are Using Facebook to Solve Crimes: Is Your Privacy at Risk?

Like digital fingerprints, we leave small clues about our lives all over the Internet — and social media is no exception.

This is especially true for Millennials, a generation that’s come of age with nearly non-stop sharing thanks to the proliferation of smartphones and social networks. It’s not just would-be identity theft criminals who exploiting Millennials’ willingness to over-share: police are paying attention, too. Continue reading Police are Using Facebook to Solve Crimes: Is Your Privacy at Risk?

ACT Government Worried About the New Facial Recognition System

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In September the government promised to put $18.5 million towards the creation of a national facial biometric matching capability for law enforcement agencies.

Continue reading ACT Government Worried About the New Facial Recognition System

British Transport Police Investigate ‘Cyber-flashing’ Case

Police are investigating a “new” crime of cyber-flashing after a commuter received an indecent image on her phone as she travelled to work.

The victim received two pictures of an unknown man’s penis on her phone via Apple’s Airdrop sharing function. She explained: “I declined the image, instinctively, and another image appeared, at which [point] I realised someone nearby must be sending them, and that concerned me. I felt violated, it was a very unpleasant thing to have forced upon my screen”. She then called the British Transport Police (BTP) as she was worried about the motives of the perpetrator.

British Transport Police are running a campaign to encourage people to report unwanted sexual behaviour
British Transport Police are running a campaign to encourage people to report unwanted sexual behaviour

Supt Gill Murray said this particular crime was new to her force and urged people to report any other incidents. The force had dealt with cases involving Bluetooth but an incident via Airdrop was “new”.

“We have a dedicated Cyber Crime Unit who can analyse mobile phones and track data transfers back to suspects’ devices. By linking this to physical evidence, such as CCTV footage or witness statements, we can catch offenders and bring them to justice through the courts”, Supt Gill Murray said.

Configuring AirDrop

Related: Learn how to configure the AirDrop function (note: the linked web page automatically starts a video with sound).

Sources: BBC News, MacWorld.

Drones May Be Future of Law Enforcement but Will They Compromise Civilian Privacy?

Drones have become the latest tools in fighting crime across the country, however their steady expansion has raised questions about privacy and regulation.

In NSW, police began trialling drones in December last year and it is still ongoing, a spokesman said. They hope to use the small, unmanned, helicopter-style devices to assist in search and rescue operations or in place of aircraft to reduce the costs and risks to officers.

Queensland police were the earliest adopters, initially adding two drones to their arsenal to provide aerial “situational awareness” in high-risk situations like a siege on Boxing Day, 2013.


Read more in SMH.

Source: www.smh.com.au

NSW Police Want Warrantless Bank Data Access

The NSW Police Force would no longer require a judge’s sign-off to gain access to the bank statements of people they suspect are engaging in criminal conduct under a police proposal before the NSW government.

The proposal would change the status quo, which requires a magistrate or registrar of a court to sign off on a “notice to produce” before police can force banking institutions to hand over documentation, such as a suspected criminal’s bank statements.

Read more in The Age.

Source: www.theage.com.au

Law Enforcement Worries Over Beefed-up Phone Encryption

Newport News – The FBI and local law enforcement agencies are concerned about new changes to cellphones that they say could hamper their ability to obtain crucial information during criminal investigations.

But not everyone agrees, with iPhone maker Apple and some privacy rights organizations saying the new technology will make the phones more secure. Moreover, some privacy advocates contend police have alternative ways of getting much of the needed information.

Source: www.dailypress.com